Here are some interviews, sometimes spicy, of persons who were in relation with the Laverda world, especially in the racing sphere.

This page has to be completed, I am then in search for other stories. Please contact me to sfcl@wanadoo.fr

Martin Hone
(Australia): He raced a RGS TTF1 at the 1984 Araï 500 km of Bathrust and finished 4th. Thanks to him
for his kind help.


"I was working as a motorcycle tester for Australian Motorcycle News magazine and had the opportunity to ride the Jota and the RGS during that time, which introduced me to the Laverda importer.

At that time I was racing a BMW R100CS for the Australian BMW importer, with sponsorship from Drum tobacco, with which I won the local "Thunderbike Series" from Ducati-mounted Kevin Magee, later to become a factory Yamaha rider in 500 GP.

When BMW stopped making the boxer twins, it also stopped wanting to race them, so the Laverda importer offered me a genuine RGS TTF1 to do the following year's Series. I understand that the bike was one of only three made, using a lighweight version of the stock frame, made by Verlicchi.

It had magnesium forks, wheels, shocks and brake calipers, carbon or Kevlar fuel tank and an engine with ported heads, mild camshafts, 36mm carbs, three-into-one exhaust and close-ratio gearbox.

It looked absolutely magnificent, but still heavy at 180kg and with slow steering characteristics.

If I knew then what I know today, we could have had a real weapon, but we raced it pretty much as it came from the factory, though I did
remove the electric starter motor and battery. On our tight race tracks, it proved a hand full compared to the nimble, overbored and stroked
720 and 750 Ducati Pantahs, but it sure sounded good.

Even the Arai 500 km Bathurst event, a race of 3-hours duration around the interesting, mountainous 6.17 km public road circuit, still didn't
really suit the TTF1, but we still finished 4th in the class. While I really enjoyed riding the TTF1, it was already a dinosaur in technology terms, particularly with regard to steering and handling, as well as overall size and weight".


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